Video 27 Apr 43,953 notes

cleolinda:

dhaunea:

makeupbox:

How to use Duos, Trios, Quads, Quintets???! (A few basic shapes that work with all eye shapes)

The first thing I always tell people when it comes to eye shadow application is - find your socket line. And learn to separate that from your crease. 

image

There is a myth about applying shadows “on/within your crease”. Well that’s fine if you have very defined, even, thick lid folds. But if you have hooded eyes, mono-lids, or smaller lids where the crease is either not visible or not high enough, many eye-shadow looks can be very unflattering or they simply disappear when you open your eyes. 

What to do? Simply replace the word “crease” with “socket line” from today on. If you have mono-lids and hooded lids, it’s important to blend your shadows UP TO your socket line at least. That not only defines your natural contours but also widens the eye. 

  1. Your socket line is where your eyeball dips into your orbital bone. Close your eyes and feel for it.
  2. Flattering eyeshadow looks are all about "creating shadow and light" in the right places. Even if your eye contours aren’t very defined naturally, placing a bit of deeper color along your socket line and a pale shade in the center of your lid will create the illusion of more pronounced contours without making you look too dramatic.
  3. I DON’T recommend creating a fake socket line higher or lower than your natural one. It can go very very wrong unless you’re an absolute pro.
  4. Many times we use brushes that are way too big or fluffy. If you have small lids or eyes, a smaller, round-ferrule pencil brush like the one from 13rushes can make life a lot easier. Go for the flatter, wider brushes if you have a bigger lid space to work with. 

Now that we’ve got that covered, you can get back to the question of “what the heck do I do with this palette that has 2-3-4-5 shades?!” and look at the images above as a reference for where colors go.

Don’t be restricted by the image with the 4 shadow palettes and the labels on each of the shades. It’s there as a reference but the best thing is to look at the eye charts, because you can use any 2 shades in a quad or a 5-color palette as a duo using a DUO diagram.

Steps don’t include liner (optional) and mascara, so you just add them later.

THESE ARE NOT RULES. They’re just basic guidelines for those who aren’t too familiar with eye makeup yet. 

Lastly, when looking for eyeshadow palettes, here are some beginners’ tips:

  1. My palette has one cream/liner/glitter shade! Well, take those out of the equation and see how many regular shadows are left. If there are 3, shadows left, follow the TRIO diagram. If there are 2, follow the DUO diagrams. 
  2. Erm, so what do I do with base/liner/glitter shades? Apply the base all over from lash line to socket bone before you begin (you don’t need to go all the way to your brows unless you want a dramatic look). For glitter shades, you can apply them as a wash all over when you’re done with the rest of your eyeshadows, or down the center of the eye for a “wet look” when you blink. Liner shades are self explanatory!
  3. DUOS: look for those where 1 shade is the same lightness or lighter than your skin color, and 1 shade is darker/smokier. Doesn’t matter if they are metallic, shimmery, matte, sparkly. For most basic daily makeup looks, you just need a light and dark to define your eyes. 
  4. All palettes: make sure there is a "balance of light to dark shades". This means at least 1 softer shade and at least 1 dark shade that is deep enough to act as a definer shade. (There are a lot of palettes where all 3-4 shades are pretty shimmery pastels. Well, sorry but they’ll look nicer on your vanity table than on your face. You need a darker shade there for definition and contouring in order for the palette to look flattering. 
  5. QUADS: What do you do if there are 2 pale shades? Which should you apply on your brow bone, and which as an accent in the center of your eye? The less shimmery/sparkly one on the brow bone, and the more dramatic and reflective one on the center of the eye. If they’re about the same texture, then it doesn’t matter which you use where.
  6. 5-6 SHADE PALETTES: Many people find them overwhelming, but you really don’t need to wear all the colors everyday. You can pick 2-3 shades and wear them as a duo or trio (See diagrams) easily. So they actually give you the most options!

Some Idiot-proof Eyeshadow recommendations:

Duos: Laura Mercier eyeshadow duos. Always well coordinated, with 1 soft/matte shade and 1 darker, richer one. Takes the guess-work out of eyeshadow application.

Trios: A lot of drugstore brands like Wet n Wild Color Icon have pre-coordinated trios with the shades marked out as lid, crease, browbone for you. Just remember “crease” = socket line. In the higher end range, Dior’s 3 Couleurs are beautifully coordinated and easy to use and blend.

Quads: Tom Fords and Chanels have some of the easier to use luxe quads in the market, but if you’re going for the Tom Fords, remember to minus out the sparkle shades. (E.g. 01 Golden Mink is what I’d consider a duo, not a quad, because there are 2 sparkle shades out of the 4, and I’d apply the 2 satin shades using one of the DUO diagrams above, and then decide how I want to apply the sparkles.)

**Laneige Pure Radiant eyeshadow quads (S$40) are a fantastic alternative - not dupes cos there are no exact palette matches, but great alternatives - for Tom Fords (S$100) because the satins and glitter textures, as well as a few of the shades, are actually very very similar. If you love the look of TFs but find the prices a little steep in Asia, take a look at the Laneige counter! See for yourself!

image

Quintets: Lancome’s Hypnose palettes are still one of my favorites. They usually have the BEST balance of dark and light shades, and they’re perfectly coordinated with each other, so you can pick any 2-3 shades out of the 5 and go.

**Diors are a good option if you have more mature lids or prefer smoother, more translucent pigments but the 5 couleurs are’t as well-balanced as Lancomes, so unless you’re very experienced and know how to add definition using liner and mascara, I’d pick a few colors and use these palettes as duos and trios rather than a quintet.

If you want to break the rules completely and do it like makeup artists do sometimes, NARS’ duos are pretty much on the opposite spectrum to Laura Mercier.

They do have light vs dark shades too, but there are also tons of funky clashing duos designed for maximum drama on the lids. Stuff like Rated R (lime and blue) and Bysance (yellow and violet) can still be applied using the 2 DUO diagrams above, but the final effect will be VERY bold. Probably better for the club than for school or work.

So very relevant to my current interests.

Helpful if you’re trying to figure out what to do with the Aromaleigh “This Is My Design" colors. I have deep-set eyes, so yeah, I generally blend a "crease" color up to/over my socket line so you can even see it. I’m experimenting with some of the other colors to see what might blend well with the darker or more vivid shades; turns out that Tattler is really, really pretty blended with Everlasting Credit as your lighter shade, like a sunset. It also worked with Yarrow, a matte, and would probably work with a shimmer like Sophie. I’m still working out what might go with Ravenstag and Murder Tie. 

Video 23 Apr 166,923 notes

who-let-the-daleks-out:

thenerdgirlcometh:

I actually believe artists and scientists think very similarly. Complex, abstract thought? They both have that down. It’s all about where that thinking takes you after that.

Words cannot describe how much I love this post.

(Source: youtube.com)

Video 23 Apr 74,723 notes
Photo 23 Apr 31 notes talesfromtheend:

Mindless lunchbreak sketching to keep myself sane through work grind

talesfromtheend:

Mindless lunchbreak sketching to keep myself sane through work grind

Photo 4 Feb 1,871 notes fictograph:

Hey, I know a lot of you have been coming here from my process  tutorial and my hands tutorial.  
I haven’t been drawing that much lately, so I finally uploaded all the video tutorials I made with my buddy Evan (who runs an awesome Japan tour company which I’ll be going on!).  Enjoy!
PERSPECTIVE:
01 - Shapes: http://youtu.be/zG3VzIkl3rY
02 - Horizon Line: http://youtu.be/Vu4goFyZOX0
03 - 1-Pt Perspective: http://youtu.be/6UBdkbeTGe4
04 - 2-Pt Perspective: http://youtu.be/hHfnE0wF3Sw
05 - 3-Pt Perspective: http://youtu.be/5u0LW-1fFz4
ANATOMY:
01 - Gesture: http://youtu.be/38aTCoId1Ko
02 - Shape and Volume: http://youtu.be/sGSv8bwsvXc
03 - Torso: http://youtu.be/hh5fkiIVbRs
04 - Head: http://youtu.be/sAHSW2vDRAY
05 - Legs: http://youtu.be/ItnIsBUya28
06 - Arms: http://youtu.be/MR0TcY6nZUI
LIGHTING:
01 - Basics: http://youtu.be/JPc_NE6YBCQ
02 - Translucency: http://youtu.be/RsoHKz8GCPU
You can also see my fugly face, ahaha…. back when my hair was still a normal color.

fictograph:

Hey, I know a lot of you have been coming here from my process  tutorial and my hands tutorial.  

I haven’t been drawing that much lately, so I finally uploaded all the video tutorials I made with my buddy Evan (who runs an awesome Japan tour company which I’ll be going on!).  Enjoy!

PERSPECTIVE:

ANATOMY:

LIGHTING:

You can also see my fugly face, ahaha…. back when my hair was still a normal color.

Video 29 Jan 115,777 notes

siljes-grimoire:

sulphurblue:

loreleysfairlyangelic:

sulphurblue:

failmacaw:

THE NINE CHOIRS OF HEAVEN.  An info-graphic for my editorial class and god am I thankful it’s done.  Way too much went into this than what I had time for, but hey… I actually kind of like it?

Now excuse me, I must return to my fashion major lifestyle and go sew a coat u_u

EDIT:  Re-uploaded with easier viewing! 

Beautiful graphic. Gorgeous. 

An info-graphic to go along with my Angelic Hierarchies post?  Thank goodness!

There’s some disparity. I was always taught the order was supposed to go Seraphim, Cherubim, Ophanim, Dominions, Virtues, Powers, Principalities, Archangels, angels. 

That was my only gripe. But I can forgive because this was so beautiful. 

Just jumping in here because this is one of my favorite things to research in my spare time. c:

From everything I’ve studied, there are at least ten different versions of the Hierarchy, at least in Medieval theology. And some of the groups in each sphere have various names (such as Thrones also being called Ophanim), and there are a few groups that only appear in certain manuscripts and never again (such as Aeons and Hosts in the 1st Century Apostolic Constitutions). A few manuscripts only list seven ranks, and others invert the order of angels completely.

That’s not even looking at the Jewish angelic hierarchy, which is completely different and comprised of ten (I think?) separate ranks of angels. Although I don’t know much on this other than a passing glance; I am not Jewish nor have I studied Judaism in depth.

I can’t speak on what is being taught in Christian groups now, as my family was never that religious. But just like all parts of religion, the Angelic Hierarchy contradicts itself depending on who you reference from, but it seems the above is the commonly accepted order.

I have also seen referenced two different classes of Archangels. One is capitalized and refers to Michael, Gabriel, etc, or those angels who have authority over all angels (which is a whole other matter: some sources refer to four Archangels, some refer to seven, the New Testament only refers to Michael and Gabriel, it all gets very confusing). And the second group is lowercase and simply refers to the 8th angelic rank.

I’ve also seen Satan referred to as belonging to different spheres. Ephesians 6:12 could be interpreted as Satan belonging to Powers, but Thomas Aquinas claims he was a Cherub. Lucifer is generally considered an Archangel (capitalized) or a Seraph, I think, but don’t quote me on that as it is also my UPG (whether or not you consider Satan and Lucifer the same is your own UPG and whole different story entirely, I don’t yet know where I stand on that matter).

But for all I know I could have everything backwards on this, I am not a scholarly source on angels. I just enjoy studying them.

Video 13 Aug 230,733 notes

captainsart:

Here’s some tips, of course nothing professional, but things I’ve learned myself.

Hope it helps some of you guys. ovo

(Source: )

Video 17 May 28,483 notes

thetroglodyte:

I got asked about eyes and how to convey expression through them, so I doodles some quick stuffs to help explain.

So have some eyeballs.

Link 30 Oct 57,188 notes ♦ The Great Game: Using Real Psychology in Your Writing»
via swan queen.
Link 14 Oct 1,615 notes Emma Coats’ “22 #storybasics I've picked up in my time at Pixar”»

austinkleon:

storyshots:

Here they are, a mix of things learned from directors & coworkers at Pixar, listening to writers & directors talk about their craft, and via trial and error in the making of my own films.

#1: You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.

#2: You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be v. different.

#3: Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.

#4: Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.

#5: Simplify. Focus. Combine characters. Hop over detours. You’ll feel like you’re losing valuable stuff but it sets you free.

#6: What is your character good at, comfortable with? Throw the polar opposite at them. Challenge them. How do they deal?

#7: Come up with your ending before you figure out your middle. Seriously. Endings are hard, get yours working up front.

#8: Finish your story, let go even if it’s not perfect. In an ideal world you have both, but move on. Do better next time.

#9: When you’re stuck, make a list of what WOULDN’T happen next. Lots of times the material to get you unstuck will show up.

#10: Pull apart the stories you like. What you like in them is a part of you; you’ve got to recognize it before you can use it.

#11: Putting it on paper lets you start fixing it. If it stays in your head, a perfect idea, you’ll never share it with anyone.

#12: Discount the 1st thing that comes to mind. And the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th – get the obvious out of the way. Surprise yourself.

#13: Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.

#14: Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.

#15: If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.

#16: What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character. What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against.

#17: No work is ever wasted. If it’s not working, let go and move on - it’ll come back around to be useful later.

#18: You have to know yourself: the difference between doing your best & fussing. Story is testing, not refining.

#19: Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.

#20: Exercise: take the building blocks of a movie you dislike. How d’you rearrange them into what you DO like?

#21: You gotta identify with your situation/characters, can’t just write ‘cool’. What would make YOU act that way?

#22: What’s the essence of your story? Most economical telling of it? If you know that, you can build out from there.

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